August 2, 2021

Independent Software Vendor, Explained!

The world is changing. The way we interact with technology, the way we consume media and entertainment, it's all shifting. The most important companies in the world are tech-companies like Apple, Google, Amazon and Facebook; these companies hold incredible power over the future of our economy. We've seen how quickly they can change their business models to adapt to consumer behavior; this has profound implications for every industry on earth! One company that really stands out as a prime example of this behavior is an "independent software vendor" (ISV). These organizations run businesses very similarly to tech giants like Microsoft or Adobe - but without any direct control over their end users' devices.

An ISV is an acronym for "independent software vendor" which means a company that sells or licenses packaged software, often to other companies. The term can be used in different ways depending on the context of the conversation. For instance, it could refer to a small company that creates its products using open source tools or it could refer to proprietary software being sold or licensed by larger software development teams. Regardless of how people use the term, when referring to an ISV partner it is typically referring to a third-party hardware or software developer that provides solutions within specific industries. 

What Is An ISV?

ISVs are independent software vendors which are typically small companies that make use of open source technologies to create their products. But ISVs can also be larger companies that sell proprietary software. Their main purpose is to provide solutions for business problems by using technology to solve issues within the industry they serve. The majority of ISVs sell software to other businesses, rather than end-users, although there are some exceptions. 

There have been cases where ISVs have required a good deal of support from their development team to ensure that the product they created is a marketable solution. For example,  Adobe Systems had to significantly retool their Flash product before it could be used in a business setting. Independent software vendors came into existence when many companies saw the success of software like Apple's Macintosh Office, which allowed users to do everyday tasks using an easy-to-use graphical interface. These software packages were difficult for many companies to make compatible with their systems, so they turned to independent developers who were focused on creating a better user experience [similar products]. 

ISVs are not limited in what they can create. They have been known to both modify existing open-source programs and create new proprietary solutions. Many companies nowadays are turning to ISVs for third-party applications that are compatible with their systems. Adobe Systems created the "ISV Certification Program" to help users identify high-quality software solutions. The program has high standards for its participants and allows Adobe to maintain a directory of software that is compatible. Adobe assesses each application based on its: 

• Ease of integration into other products or services; 

• High-performance capabilities; 

• Quality of user experience; 

• Comprehensive feature set; and 

• Market potential [competition]. 

In this article, we will explore the concept of independent software vendors in detail. We will explain what they are and discuss what makes a good ISV partner. When an ISV reaches a certain level of success, it becomes important for them to establish a relationship with other companies that have similar interests. In some cases, the company is an active participant in communities such as GitHub, where they can show their expertise in open source technologies while gaining credibility from potential partners. In other cases, the ISV would be looking for someone who has been tested by another business or organization. 

What Is An ISV Certified?

There are two main types of ISVs: those that have been certified and those that have not. Each type has a different purpose within the realm of IT, so it is important to understand which type you are talking about when discussing an independent software vendor's role in your company's IT operations.

When pursuing certification from an ISV, it is very helpful to know what their specific program entails for both parties before getting started with the process. It is also important to note that not all programs require certification, but most do provide some form of certification or accreditation after completing a certain number of steps within the scope of their program. 

An ISV is typically a small company that uses open-source software to create their products, but can also be larger companies that sell proprietary software. Their main purpose is to provide solutions for business problems by using technology to solve issues within the industry they serve. The majority of independent software vendors sell software to other businesses, rather than end-users, although there are some exceptions. 

There have been cases where ISVs have required a good deal of support from their development team to ensure that the product they created is a marketable solution. For example, Adobe Systems had to significantly retool their Flash product before it could be used in a business setting. Independent software vendors came into existence when many companies saw the success of software like Apple's Macintosh. 

One way for those in the know about open source and free software development tools can recognize trusted suppliers is through certification as a partner of Red Hat Inc., the company behind the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) operating system and JBoss enterprise Java application server. Those that are approved by Red Hat are known as Red Hat Certified Professionals(RHCPs). The term has expanded beyond open-source software to the broader IT industry in recent years.

The program, which is currently in version 4, uses a series of three tiers. Each tier has rules associated with it that must be met for certification. It's important when seeking out an ISV partner or when thinking about pursuing an ISV partnership yourself to know what level you are looking for because not all programs have the same standards and mandates.

There are various methods and qualifications involved in the process of becoming a certified partner of Red Hat.

Eligibility:

• Must be IBM-certified architects who work for IBM Global Business Services

• Must have at least five years of experience in deploying the full RHEL stack

• Must have completed Red Hat training courses or have equivalent experience 

Proving Your Skill:

The process requires extensive documentation showing your qualifications. You must also present a presentation to Red Hat partners demonstrating how you will help customers with specific technical objectives. Finally, you are required to pass an exam that costs $2,000 per attempt. Only three attempts are allowed for this test. It's worth noting that these exams are proctored and must be taken at an official testing site. Once all criteria are met, there is no fee associated with certification because it is managed by IBM Global Business Services on behalf of Red Hat Inc.

What Is An ISV Partner? 

When someone talks about their ISV partner, they are typically referring to those companies who have formed some kind of alliance with the independent software vendor. Most often these kinds of partnerships involve some kind of licensing agreement. If your company is not a member of the particular program that an ISV offers then you do not qualify as an ISV partner and will be charged for any services and/or products received from the partnership.

A good example of this would be Adobe Creative Cloud which requires an annual fee for all users on top of whatever price they charge for each product or service offered by Adobe Systems Incorporated. This can be confusing so it's important to understand what level you fall under when working with such programs;

Eligibility:

• Certification as a Jive Service Partner or knowledge of Jive Services

• Must be an existing Adobe Certified Expert who works for one of the following companies: IBM Global Business Services, Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Services (LMIS&GS), AT&T Global Network Services (GNS), and Verizon Enterprise Solutions.

Organizational similarities:

• Have at least five years of experience in providing services that involve using the full Creative Cloud stack. 

To Conclude

The term ISV partner is typically reserved for those who are members of specific programs. These companies often pay a monthly or yearly fee to gain access to software, services, and other resources that Adobe Inc. has made available to them. As always, it's important to investigate the program before joining to avoid paying extra fees when interacting with your certified ISV partner.

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Spencer Farber

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